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Evaluating potential for ground and surface water contamination from new and traditional munitions
Katerina Dontsova
Session
Co-leader(s)
Benjamin Cancès, Jessy Jaunat, Tom Meixner, Pascale Bauda, Aurélie Cebron
Project type
Projet ROHM
OHM(s) involved
  • OHM Pays de Bitche
  • OHM Pima County
Biogéochimie, Hydrologie, Pédologie, Santé publique
Contamination from military training presents significant concern across different environments. We are proposing a research project that examines potential for contamination from the new energetic compounds, that are part of insensitive munitions. While transport of traditional explosives like 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) have been extensively studied, fate of new munitions formulations that are being introduced now, like IMX - 104, containing 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) in addition to RDX are less known. However, higher solubility of NTO and DNAN, and negative charge of NTO in at environmentally-relevant pHs range indicate greater potential for their transport in soils into groundwater and surface waters, than traditional TNT and RDX.
Here we are proposing studies across two locations with contrasting climatic conditions, an arid one in Arizona, USA, in close vicinity of the Human-Environment Observatory (OHM) Pima County and one in Moselle region of France, location of OHM Bitche County observatory, with wetter conditions and the occurrence of organic soils.
We are proposing a combination of laboratory experiments using soils collected on or close to the training ranges at the two locations – Bitche in France and Fort Huachuca in USA –and predictive modeling that would evaluate potential for contamination on both sites from insensitive munitions deposition during training. We will evaluate several alternative climatic scenarios that represent a range of predicted changes in climate for each location. Military installations are important source of income for the local communities, but their sustainability critically depends on ability to maintain environmental quality under changing use.

Leader

Katerina Dontsova
I am a soil scientist with interest in interactions between physical, chemical, and biological processes that take place in the soils. My primary focus is in soil chemistry, including dissolution, precipitation, and sorption reactions in the soils with both basic science applications including critical zone processes, mineral-organic interactions and applied research looking at fate and transport of organic contaminants and nano-particles in soils that is relevant to environmental quality.

Participants

Aurélie
Cebron
Titular of a PhD in microbial ecology, CNRS researcher. I am future leader of the Team « Microbial ecology of contaminated environment » in the Interdisplinary laboratory for continental environments (LIEC UMR CNRS 7360). I am interested in microbial community dynamics in relation with carbon cycle. In the present project, we will try to infer active bacterial community structure and microbial traits to IM bacterial transformation processes.
Pascale
Bauda
Titular of a PhD in microbial ecotoxicology, I am teaching Microbial Ecology in Lorraine University. I am leader of the Team « Microbial ecology of contaminated environment » in the Interdisplinary laboratory for continental environments (LIEC UMR CNRS 7360). I am interested in microbial community dynamics and their functional consequences. In the present project, we will try to infer active bacterial community structure to IM bacterial transformation processes.
Jessy
Jaunat
Lecturer at Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne specialized in the study of groundwater flows, aquifer vulnerability and the transfer of contaminants (including molecules from military origin, eg. Perchlorates and energetic compounds) in the water cycle by the use of hydrochemical and isotopic methods.
Benjamin
Cancès
Lecturer at Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne specialized in the study of the behavior of metallic trace elements (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As,...) in contaminated soils at different scales of soil organization (from the macroscopic to the molecular scale) by the implementation of several analytical techniques
Thomas
Meixner
Professor and Department Head, Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences. Watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry hydrologic controls on water quality, GIS, remote sensing, hydrochemical modeling, atmospheric chemistry, aqueous geochemistry, water quality modeling, sensitivity analysis, automatic parameter estimation, semi-arid hydrology, riparian sustainability, climate change impacts on water resources, and multi-criteria analysis.